We tried.
It didn’t work.

Let’s put the Ethanol Mandate behind us.

We tried.
It didn’t work.

Let’s put the Ethanol Mandate behind us.

There is a mandate in place that requires your gasoline to contain 10% ethanol. The intent was to reduce carbon emissions, but in reality, ethanol production is more harmful to our environment and economy than lawmakers realized.

Rethink Ethanol is a new initiative to address our nation’s failed mandated and subsidized corn-based ethanol policies.  We will be engaging voters, thought leaders, industry experts, and policymakers in a frank conversation on the effects of corn-based ethanol.

%

Estimated increase in cost of corn between 2006 and 2011 attributed to the RFS mandate. The RFS creates a guaranteed demand for ethanol that does not reflect market realities.

Source: Our Energy Policy – The Effect of the US Ethanol Mandate on Corn Prices

The number of years it took us to remedy our lands from edge tillage. Edge tillage is planting right up to the edge of the field thereby removing protective bordering lands and increasing soil erosion, chemical runoff and other problems. It took us 40 years to end edge tillage in this country, and overnight ethanol brought it back with a vengeance.

Source: Forbes Magazine: “It’s Final — Corn Ethanol Is Of No Use”

Recent land conversions to grow more corn and soybeans released 131 million tons of carbon into the air between 2008 and 2012, as much as 34 coal-fired power plants.

Source: April 2015 study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin.

BREAKING NEWS

Comments on EPA Proposed Rule for 2019 Biomass Volumes

By Jerry Jung

My name is Jerry Jung.  I reside in Birmingham, Michigan.  Three years ago I started a webpage entitled “RethinkEthanol.com.”  The webpage has a link to my resume’ outlining both my credentials and my motivation to comment on the proposed rule. 

I support the EPA’s decision to grant D6 RIN waivers to small refiners and also support applying D6 RIN credits for exported corn ethanol.  In light of the EPA’s acknowledgment of the environmental harm caused by the corn ethanol mandate, I also support lowering the 2019 Renewable Volume Obligation (RVO) for conventional biofuel.

In the last two years I have made twenty trips to Washington D.C. on the topic of ethanol mandates.  I have met with several dozen legislators, a score of trade and environmental associations, as well key administrative officials including former Administrator Pruitt. 

The rationale to pass the Renewable Fuel Standard included a smorgasbord of admirable objectives, none of which have materialized.  These goals included an inexpensive way to increase the octane ratings of gasoline; a way to reduce reliance on foreign oil imports; a way to invigorate the farm economy; an environmentally friendly manner in which to reduce harmful emissions; and a renewable approach to energy production that would conserve existing resources.  Some supporters of the RFS also pointed to food security issues.   Many ethanol advocates still utilize these arguments, but the ten year history of ramped up corn ethanol production leaves little room to doubt that the initiative has failed and hurts many more than it helps.  The following comments address each of these lofty goals and why they have not only failed, but have indeed worsened the very situations they were intended to ameliorate.

Background:  When ethanol is added to gasoline, its octane rating increases.  An increase in octane is not to be confused with an increase in power, as ethanol has less energy density than pure gasoline.  What ethanol does, like lead and MBTE before it, is to delay ignition with the result that engines operate at higher compression ratios.  This allows car manufacturers to utilize smaller engines.  Currently some car companies are lobbying for higher base octane ratings as a way to reduce costs, improve fuel efficiency and reduce emissions.

The results:  Prior to the passage of RFS and the subsequent rapid ramp up in RVOs, the price differential between grades of gasoline was 10-20 cents.  Typically, if 87 octane gasoline sold for $2.00, 89 octane gasoline would sell for $2.10 and premium grade 91 octane gasoline would sell for $2.20.  Today the spread between regular gasoline and premium gasoline has increased (here in Michigan) from 20 cents pre-RFS, to 90 cents today.  The potential cost savings associated with smaller high compression engines has been more than offset by the increased cost of high octane fuel.

Continue Reading…

NEW
RESOURCE

National Wildlife Federation opens ethanol mandate reform website.

 

National Wildlife Federation New Website on Ethanol

Check out the new website >

The EPA can improve the quality of our air, water, and land by accepting the reality that the national policy to promote corn-based ethanol is a failure. This policy, initially well intended, is devastating to our environment and to our wildlife. It’s distorting food quality and prices. And, our government is wasting taxpayers’ money to further the damage caused by corn-based ethanol. It is time to stop and rethink ethanol.

In 2007, Congress passed the Renewable Fuel Standard with good intentions: reducing dependence on fossil fuels, accelerating development of sustainable biofuels, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Unfortunately, nine years later, there have been severe unintended consequences—large-scale loss of wildlife habitat (especially native grasslands) and degradation of water quality—and wildlife has borne the brunt of these impacts.

Ethanol production is damaging to land, water, air and wildlife. 

Join the
Conversation

Join the
Conversation

#RETHINKETHANOL

rethinkethanol's Twitter avatar
rethinkethanol
@rethinket

Really interesting read in @detroitnews by @JeffaStier #ReThinkEthanol t.co/ak9JTjqvfW

rethinkethanol's Twitter avatar
rethinkethanol
@rethinket

Worth reading in today's @seattlepi and why we need to #ReThinkEthanol t.co/cUglYXWchN

rethinkethanol's Twitter avatar
rethinkethanol
@rethinket

Another strong proof point that it's time to #ReThinkEthanol t.co/DEakhG9mh4

RETHINK ETHANOL

Rethink Ethanol is a non-profit group dedicated to increasing awareness and initiating changes in ethanol usage in order to help the environment and people.

© 2016 Rethink Ethanol | Privacy Policy

CONTACT US

Phone: 313-909-3034
Email: info@rethinkethanol.com

 

FOLLOW US